Sony Cybershot DSCT500 Digital Camera

first_imgImage courtesy of CoolGadgetsZone Citation: Sony Cybershot DSC-T500 Digital Camera (2008, September 3) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2008-09-sony-cybershot-dsc-t500-digital-camera.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. The DSC-T500 uses MPEG-4 movie format to give you high quality video recording while maintaining a small file size. The DSC-T500, 10-megapixel camera, features a wide and full-screen 720p movie recording at 30 fps in fine, standard and VGA recording modes. This makes the resolution of this camera three times higher than a standard definition movie.The LCD viewing screen measures 3.5″ diagonally (16:9 aspect ratio) and is also a touch panel, which makes navigation very easy. Unlike other LCD screens, this LCD can be viewed in strong outside light. The camera incorporates a Carl Zeiss 5x optical zoom lens with a wide field of view of 33-165 mm, which is the 35 mm camera equivalency.Additional features include:• Optical SteadyShot – image stabilization• ISO up to 3200• Approximately 4 GB internal memory• Expandable memory (memory stick media card)• Face detection (automatically detects up to eight faces in the camera frame and adjusts focus, exposure and flash)• Connect to HDTV via HDMI cable (sold separately)• Record video in both wide and full-screen mode at 720p at 30 fps• Create slideshows with sophisticated slide transitions, pre-recorded background music or add your own• Picture Motion Browser software lets you organize and view your pictures• 13 Scene Modes: high sensitivity, twilight, twilight portrait, soft-snap, landscape, beach, snow, fireworks, hi-speed shutter, smile shutter, gourmet, auto adjustment, and underwaterVia: CoolGadgetsZone and Digital Photography Review Sony is adding high-definition video recording to their digital camera line with the introduction of the Cybershot DSC-T500. The DSC-T500 has the ability to capture still images while in video recording mode. This camera is due to be released in late September and will sell for about $400.last_img read more

Security Alert Beware of SMS Messages That Can Take Control of Your

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (PhysOrg.com) — Trust Digital has proven that an attacker with the right knowledge and toolkits can remotely hijack a phone by sending an SMS message to it. The attack would be most effective if it took place in the middle of the night while you are asleep. Foldable phone opens into large OLED screen These attacks are real and can originate from any where in the world. Trust Digital recently announced software called EMM 8.0 that can help organizations protect employee phones from these types of attacks. For detailed information about EMM 8.0 software, please visit the Trust Digital Web site.© 2009 PhysOrg.com Explore further Citation: Security Alert: Beware of SMS Messages That Can Take Control of Your Phone (2009, April 20) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2009-04-beware-sms-messages.html The attack, on your phone, would start by receiving a text message that would automatically start up the web browser and direct it to malicious Web site. The site would then download an executable file to the phone and steal all your personal data. The following video demonstrates this:last_img read more

A milestone for molecular beams

first_img A synchrotron for neutral molecules This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Meijer is a scientist at the Fritz Haber Institute in Berlin, Germany. Working with a group of scientists from his institution, as well as from the Laser Centre at Vrije University in Amsterdam and the Institute for Molecules and Materials at Radboud University in Nijmegen, The Netherlands, Meijer demonstrated that it is possible to maintain control over neutral molecules traveling for a mile in a ring. Their work is published in Physical Review Letters: “Multiple Packets of Neutral Molecules Revolving for over a Mile.”“Our experiment is really about getting complete control over molecules in beams,” Meijer explains. “We have shown that it is possible to completely control these packets of neutral molecules, and keep them in circle orbit – while at the same time making them move very slowly.”The ring in question consists of 40 electrostatic focusing elements called hexapoles. The hexapoles keep a packet of molecules (for this experiment, ammonia) confined to a circular orbit. Even though we think of these types of machines as rather large, the setup in question is reasonably compact. “It fits almost on my table,” Meijer says. “The diameter is about 50 centimeters, making it possible to do the kinds of experiments we suggest with relative ease.”The ring setup allows for the injection of 19 separate packets of molecules, all of them moving at the same pace, trailing each other by a fixed distance. Meijer and his colleagues were able to keep this up as the molecule packets made enough round trips through the ring to surpass the distance of a mile. “Interesting things happen when you can store molecules that long,” Meijer points out. “We’ve found that there are interesting things that happen with black body radiation, and this device could be one way to study these effects without the normally complicated experiments seen in the past.”“Normally, your interaction time with a neutral molecule is quite small,” Meijer says, “only a millisecond. Our device allows you to extend the time to 10 seconds, providing the chance to study molecules much better. We can see how well we can control free molecules, and study them in more detail.”So far, Meijer and the members of the team have not learned anything new. “We used a molecule we understand very well, since our goal was to demonstrate that it is possible to have this level of control over these molecules,” Meijer explains. It’s the next step, he says, that should be exciting.“Right now, we have shown that we can control these molecules very well, with them all going the same direction,” Meijer says. “To study collisions, we are adding another beam that can inject molecules from the other side. Sometime next year, we should be able to set up for collision studies.”“We have little information about what happens during collisions at low energies,” he continues. “Once we start the collisions with our machines, we should begin learning something new.” Explore further 40-piece molecular synchtron used by the team for their experiment. Image credit: Fritz Haber Institute. More information: Peter C. Zieger, Sebastiaan Y.T. van de Meerakker, Cynthia E. Heiner, Hendrick L. Bethlem, André J.A. van Roij, and Gerard Meijer, “Multiple Packets of Neutral Molecules Revolving for over a Mile,” Physical Review Letters (2010). Available online: link.aps.org/doi/10.1103/PhysRevLett.105.173001 (PhysOrg.com) — When we think of molecular collisions, we often consider massive colliders, like the LHC, sending particles smashing into each other at very high energies. While this is interesting work, it’s not the only type of collision that requires study. “Normally, you have molecules colliding at high velocities,” Gerard Meijer tells PhysOrg.com. “But we don’t know as much about low energy collisions. Being able to control molecules, and slow them down could provide another interesting line of study at the fundamental level.” Copyright 2010 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. Citation: A milestone for molecular beams (2010, October 29) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-10-milestone-molecular.htmllast_img read more

Physics duo describe a way to guarantee true randomness

first_imgIllustration of the bipartite set-up. Image (c) Nature Physics (2012) doi:10.1038/nphys2300 Journal information: Nature Physics Roger Colbeck and Renato Renner, as they describe in their paper published in Nature Physics, have figured out a way to virtually guarantee randomness in a constant stream of information. They say their technique can also transform a stream of not quite random data, to one that is truly random.Their work is based on experiments done with quantum entanglement, whereby two particles appear to coexist in separate places. What happens to one, happens to the other at exactly the same time. Scientists don’t yet know how it happens, but they are now able to make it happen whenever they want. In looking at studies of quantum entanglement, Colbeck and Renner noted that physicists involved in the study tended to assume that the measurements used to study the phenomenon were originally random.Because of this, the two calculated what would likely happen if a stream of data that was only partially random was correlated with other variables, thus ensuring that bits of information would not be random. If those bits of information were used to choose measurements on paired particles that were entangled that were caused to go down different paths the outcome would have to be independent of the other variables, which would mean true randomness had been achieved.The two say that this process could be applied to real world data to create true random data streams that could be used in virtually any application that requires the use of truly random numbers. Researchers roll Einstein’s dice: Developing a quantum random number generator © 2012 Phys.Org Explore furthercenter_img More information: Free randomness can be amplified, Nature Physics (2012) doi:10.1038/nphys2300AbstractAre there fundamentally random processes in nature? Theoretical predictions, confirmed experimentally, such as the violation of Bell inequalities, point to an affirmative answer. However, these results are based on the assumption that measurement settings can be chosen freely at random, so assume the existence of perfectly free random processes from the outset. Here we consider a scenario in which this assumption is weakened and show that partially free random bits can be amplified to make arbitrarily free ones. More precisely, given a source of random bits whose correlation with other variables is below a certain threshold, we propose a procedure for generating fresh random bits that are virtually uncorrelated with all other variables. We also conjecture that such procedures exist for any non-trivial threshold. Our result is based solely on the no-signalling principle, which is necessary for the existence of free randomness.via ScienceNews (Phys.org) — In the natural world, it seems randomness is all around. Walk through a forest for example and it appears completely random, despite the fact that natural patterns emerge at almost every turn. In the human world, randomness is valued by all manner of people in a variety of circumstances, from testers of systems to ensure that weaknesses show up before products are sold to the public, to cryptologists, to those that run casinos where randomness ensures the house will win far more often than not. Unfortunately, guaranteeing true randomness is not something that comes easy. Take the lowly coin toss for example. A slight difference in weight on the “heads” side may cause the “tales” side to turn up a hundredth of a percentage point more often. Because of this, new work by a pair of physicists is catching the attention of people across a wide swath of interests. Citation: Physics duo describe a way to guarantee true randomness (2012, May 8) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-05-physics-duo-true-randomness.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Partnership unveils healthcare robot coach Autom

first_img Explore further Citation: Partnership unveils healthcare robot coach: Autom (2012, October 22) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-10-partnership-unveils-healthcare-robot-autom.html © 2012 Phys.org PCH International is partnering with Intuitive Automata to create and bring to market what the two are calling a “healthcare robot coach.” They have named it Autom (a homophone of autumn). The purpose of the robot is to help people develop healthy eating habits. It sits on a table or countertop and serves as a tool to help people track what they eat, and also offers encouraging comments to help people achieve eating goals. Robot takes on battle of the bulge Autom speaks to its owner and follows his or her movements with its eyes, though only when touch activated. It also has a touch screen embedded in its belly that allows the user to enter food information. The robot can be used to track the caloric content of meals consumed or those being considered by accessing, via WiFi, an online database maintained by Intuitive. The company claims it has entered information for over 75,000 food items including those from many nationally known restaurants. The robot can also display historical information on its belly screen in a variety of formats, including graphs, to help users compare actual eating habits with objectives. The robot also offers encouraging comments to help the user eat the foods that are good for them and to avoid those that are not. In addition to following a person around a room with its eyes, Autom can blink or wink to add emotional heft to its encouraging commentary. Representatives from Intuitive say that the robot format, as compared to apps on a smartphone, allow for bonding to occur between human and machine, which in the end helps users achieve their eating goals via a relationship that develops between the two – similar to the benefit people derive from hiring a human healthcare specialist. Comments on the Autom website suggest that potential customers view the robot as a personal coach, akin to a human counterpart, because company engineers have programmed the Autom to learn about the person being coached and to adjust encouraging comments accordingly. They also announce that Autom will be available by the second quarter of next year and will cost $199, with an additional $19 surcharge per month for access to the online database. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Researchers uncover amazing physics feat of spitting Archerfish

first_img © 2013 Phys.org Play Low-resolution color movie showing an archer fish shooting a jet of water to a prey supported by a clear plastic film. During the shooting the mouth of the fish barely emerges from the interface between water and air, while the rest of his body remains submerged. The image sequence has been grabbed at 400 frames/s and is played at 25 fps. Credit: doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0047867.s001 All in all, it’s an amazing use of math and physics—all by a fish with barely any brains. Watching Archerfish in action, most would likely be impressed at the way they catch their food. They move to just below the surface then shoot a mouthful of water into the air. The water eventually reaches an insect perched on a branch or blade of grass and knocks it into the water. As the water is inflight, the fish is already on the move, positioning itself to where it knows the insect will land. Then it eats it.Vailati and his colleagues can’t explain how the fish is able to calculate the proper trajectory of its water blob, or how it knows when and where to position itself, but they are able to explain why the water expulsion technique the fish uses, is so successful. It comes down to principles of Physics.To start things off the researchers filmed the fish—slowing down the action to see what was happening. They discovered what seemed impossible—that the water was actually accelerating as it headed towards its target. Further investigation revealed how it was possible.First off, the fish pushes the water out harder the longer its spurt lasts. This means that the water at the tail end of the blob of water is moving faster than the water at the leading end. That would normally mean the water blob would flatten as it ran into itself and spread out. Not in this case, instead the fish uses a known fluid dynamics property called the Plateau–Rayleigh instability. This is where water moving as a stream brakes down into small pieces—small segments form and are eventually pinched off to create entirely separate, much smaller blobs, of liquid, all moving in the same direction as the original stream. So, because the tiny blobs are separated, the original blob doesn’t bunch up as it travels. But, then it does, as the tiny blobs in back catch up with the ones in front, just before it hits the targeted insect, knocking it, violently off its perch and into the water below. PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen (Phys.org) —Alberto Vailati and colleagues at the University of Milan have uncovered a truly astonishing feat of physics used by spitting Archerfish to catch prey. Vailati et al report in a paper they’ve had published in the journal PLoS ONE, that the fish actually cause a mouthful of water they expel, to speed up, as it travels through the air on its way to its target. More information: Vailati A, Zinnato L, Cerbino R (2012) How Archer Fish Achieve a Powerful Impact: Hydrodynamic Instability of a Pulsed Jet in Toxotes jaculatrix. PLoS ONE 7(10): e47867. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0047867AbstractArcher fish knock down insects anchored to vegetation by hitting them with a precisely aimed jet of water. The striking force of the jet at the impact is such to overcome the strong anchoring forces of insects. The origin of the effectiveness of such hunting mechanism has been long searched for inside of the fish, in the unsuccessful attempt to identify internal structures dedicated to the amplification of muscular power. Here we perform a kinematic analysis of the jet emitted by two specimens of Toxotes jaculatrix. We estimate that at the impact the jet conveys a typical specific power of about 3000 W/kg, which is well above the maximum specific power of the order of 500 W/kg deliverable by a vertebrate muscle. Unexpectedly, we find that the amplification of muscular power occurs outside of the fish, and is due to a hydrodynamic instability of the jet akin to those occurring in Drop-on-Demand inkjet printing. The investigated fish are found to modulate the velocity of the jet at the orifice to favor the formation of a single, large, water drop that hits the prey abruptly with a large momentum. The observed mechanism represents a remarkable example of use of an external hydrodynamic lever that does possibly not entail the high evolutionary cost needed for the development of highly specialized internal structures dedicated to the storing of mechanical energy.via Wired Citation: Researchers uncover amazing physics feat of spitting Archerfish (2013, December 3) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-12-uncover-amazing-physics-feat-archerfish.htmlcenter_img Explore further Journal information: PLoS ONE Archer fish hunt insects with water jet 6 times stronger than their muscular power This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Propagation of the jet. Credit: PLoS ONE 7(10): e47867. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0047867last_img read more

Best of Last Week – New type of planet found workload sharing

first_img © 2014 Phys.org (Phys.org) —It’s been a busy week for space scientists—a team of astronomers discovered the first Thorne-Zytkow object—it’s a weird type of hybrid between a red supergiant and a neutron star that looks like a regular red supergiant, except it has a different type of chemical signature, giving it away. Another team of astronomers found a new type of planet: The ‘mega-Earth’. It’s rocky and weighs 17 times as much as our own planet. And yet another team has found that surprisingly strong magnetic fields challenge black holes’ pull. Black holes surveyed had magnetic strength equal to their gravitational pull, the first such direct evidence of it. In related news, theories suggest there should be equal amounts of antimatter and matter in the universe, yet we’re not able to detect any unless we create it ourselves. Now a CERN experiment takes us one step closer to discovering where all the antimatter went. Surprisingly strong magnetic fields challenge black holes’ pull Also, graphene has been in the news an awful lot lately, due to its many interesting properties, yet because of its two-dimensional nature, it’s been limited in some respects. Now, however, scientists have found stronger 3-D material that behaves like graphene, making it easier to create the devices that were supposed to be based on graphene. In another groundbreaking effort, researchers have developed a new way to make laser-like beams using 250x less power—it’s fueled by electricity instead of light. Also groundbreaking was a report that a new therapy wiped out cervical cancer in two women. Two out of nine patients underwent complete remission. That’s very good news.In news on another front, scientists may have found a cure for laziness, as MIT lab designs workload-sharing robotic limbs. Why do heavy lifting all by yourself when you could strap a robot on your back and have it do all the work for you? It may be the wave of the future.And finally, for those people feeling squeamish about dying, comes word from researchers in Boston as Harvard confirms antique book is bound in human skin—they believe the skin came from a woman who went insane and died from a heart attack back in the 19th century. For those looking to avoid a similar fate, by not dying at all, one team of researchers has found the anti-diabetic drug metformin slows aging and lengthens lifespan—at least in roundworms. We’ll still have to wait to see if it might work for us humans, of course, but at least it gives us something to hold onto for now. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.center_img Citation: Best of Last Week – New type of planet found, workload sharing robot limbs and clues about where all the antimatter went (2014, June 9) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-06-week-planet-workload-robot-limbs.html The newly discovered ‘mega-Earth’ Kepler-10c dominates the foreground in this artist’s conception. Its sibling, the lava world Kepler-10b, is in the background. Both orbit a sunlike star. Kepler-10c has a diameter of about 18,000 miles, 2.3 times as large as Earth, and weighs 17 times as much. Therefore it is all solids, although it may possess a thin atmosphere shown here as wispy clouds. Credit: David A. Aguilar (CfA) Explore furtherlast_img read more

Moon Express reveals plans for private exploration of the moon

first_img © 2017 Phys.org More information: 52.2.80.98/ Explore further US company gets historic nod to send lander to moon As noted on the website, to date, just three entities have sent working craft to the surface of the moon, all of them big governmental operations (U.S., U.S.S.R. and China). The aim of the team at Moon Express is to change that by giving some degree of moon access to non-governmental people. To that end, the company has three missions planned. The first involves sending a probe to the moon’s surface; the second will seek to set a working research apparatus on the moon’s south pole. The third and most ambitious mission will involve sending a vehicle to the surface of the moon that will be capable of mining moon dust and then bringing it back to Earth. Officials at Moon Express are promising to make samples of moon dust and/or rocks available to ordinary people upon its return—though it is assumed the samples will be auctioned to the highest bidders to help pay for the program.At the core of the initiative by Moon Express is the idea that sending vehicles to the moon can be done without spending billions, which makes sense for them, because they are also claiming to be self-funded. Citation: Moon Express reveals plans for private exploration of the moon (2017, July 13) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-07-moon-reveals-private-exploration.html (Phys.org)—Private company Moon Express has announced via its website its plans for exploring the moon—plans that include sending three craft to the moon over the next three years. Officials with the company have also been speaking with the press regarding their ambitions. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. The plan is to use the same modular design for all three missions (and others in the future), which, of course, means reduced cost. The first vehicle is called the MX-1E and it is billed as a high-performance craft that is both eco-friendly and technically advanced. It is slated to launch atop a rocket made by Rocket Lab. The second mission will utilize the MX-1E Scout Classic—it will carry a host of scientific equipment for placement at the south pole—a location that allows for solar-powered instruments and also for constant communications with the Earth. For the third mission, the company plans to send an MX-2 to the moon, use it to retrieve surface samples, and then send part of it back to the Earth carrying the samples.The company also has plans for larger MX-5 and MX-9 vehicles to be sent to the moon in the future, each capable of carrying more equipment or return lunar material to Earth for sale.last_img read more

Barn owls found to suffer no hearing loss as they age

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further Citation: Barn owls found to suffer no hearing loss as they age (2017, September 20) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-09-barn-owls-loss-age.html Journal information: Proceedings of the Royal Society B Credit: CC0 Public Domain Guard against hearing loss from fireworkscenter_img (Phys.org)—A small team of researchers with the University of Oldenburg has found that barn owls do not suffer hearing loss as they get older. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes hearing tests they conducted with a group of trained owls, what they found and why they believe more study of the birds may lead to preventing hearing loss in aging humans. © 2017 Phys.org Most everyone knows that growing older can lead to hearing loss. It happens because humans and other mammals have an inability to regenerate sensitive cells inside the ear. As damage accumulates over time, hearing degrades. This is not the case with birds, however. Prior research has shown that some experience little if any hearing loss in their old age. In this new effort, the researchers looked to see if that also applied to long-lived birds such as the barn owl.Barn owls are the most widespread of all the owls—they are found all around the world except in polar and desert regions. They earned their name by taking up residence in barns, drawn by the rodents that are attracted to stored grains. Barn owls have exceptionally good hearing—approximately 10 times as sensitive as human hearing, according to previous research. Barn owls are able to use hearing alone to capture prey moving in total darkness. They also live a long time—some in captivity have lived to be over 20 years of age.To learn more about barn owl hearing during aging, the researchers trained seven owls (aged two to 17) to fly from one position to another to receive a treat in response to an auditory signal. The birds were then separated into age groups and the researchers tested their hearing by altering the tones. The researchers report no difference in hearing abilities between all of the birds. As an aside, the team also tested the hearing of another individual barn owl that had lived to be 23 years old, and found that its hearing was just as good as the younger owls.The researchers conclude by asserting that barn owls do not experience hearing loss as they age and suggest that studying them and other birds to learn how they regenerate damaged nerves in their ears may lead to treatments for humans. More information: Bianca Krumm et al. Barn owls have ageless ears, Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences (2017). DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2017.1584AbstractWe measured the auditory sensitivity of the barn owl (Tyto alba), using a behavioural Go/NoGo paradigm in two different age groups, one younger than 2 years (n = 4) and another more than 13 years of age (n = 3). In addition, we obtained thresholds from one individual aged 23 years, three times during its lifetime. For computing audiograms, we presented test frequencies of between 0.5 and 12 kHz, covering the hearing range of the barn owl. Average thresholds in quiet were below 0 dB sound pressure level (SPL) for frequencies between 1 and 10 kHz. The lowest mean threshold was –12.6 dB SPL at 8 kHz. Thresholds were the highest at 12 kHz, with a mean of 31.7 dB SPL. Test frequency had a significant effect on auditory threshold but age group had no significant effect. There was no significant interaction between age group and test frequency. Repeated threshold estimates over 21 years from a single individual showed only a slight increase in thresholds. We discuss the auditory sensitivity of barn owls with respect to other species and suggest that birds, which generally show a remarkable capacity for regeneration of hair cells in the basilar papilla, are naturally protected from presbycusis.last_img read more

3C 17 is a member of a newly identified galaxy cluster observations

first_img Radio galaxies emit huge amounts of radio waves from their central cores. Black holes at the center of these galaxies are accreting gas and dust, generating high-energy jets visible in radio wavelengths, which accelerate electrically charged particles to high velocities. Radio galaxies are observed to interact with their environment in often spectacular ways. For instance, in some of them, jets emanating from the central black hole are bent due to supersonic ram pressure of the intracluster medium.At a redshift of 0.22, 3C 17 (also designated PKS 0035–02) is a broad-line radio galaxy showcasing strong indications of interaction with its environment. Previous observations of this galaxy found that its radio morphology is dominated by a single-sided, dramatically curved jet.The remarkable morphology of 3C 17’s radio jet, and several unclassified sources along the jet’s path, motivated a group of astronomers led by Juan P. Madrid of Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) in Australia, to perform further studies of this galaxy. As part of their research, the team conducted observations of 3C 17 using the Gemini Multi Object Spectrograph (GMOS) of the Gemini Observatory, and analyzed observational data of this galaxy provided by NASA’s Chandra X-ray spacecraft.”An optical and X-ray study of 3C 17 and its environment was carried out using Gemini and Chandra data,” the researchers wrote in the paper.The observations allowed Madrid’s team to identify a previously uncatalogued cluster of galaxies at a redshift of 0.22, with a projected virial radius of about 1.2 million light years, and a velocity dispersion of around 821 km/s. They found that 3C 17 belongs to this cluster and that with an absolute magnitude of –22.45 it is the brightest cluster member. Furthermore, the study also revealed that 3C 17 is dominated by broad emission lines.”Its surface brightness profile is best fit with a double component model characteristic of BCGs [brightest cluster galaxies],” the paper reads.Moreover, based on the analysis of Chandra data, the scientists uncovered the presence of extended soft X-ray emission surrounding 3C 17. They assume that this emission most likely has its origin in the hot gas of the intergalactic medium.In concluding remarks, the authors of the paper say that 3C 17’s membership in a galaxy cluster explains its radio morphology. They noted that the jet of this galaxy is sharply curved as it propagates through a dense intracluster medium.The researchers added that bent-tail radio galaxies like 3C 17 could be used by astronomers as signposts for distant galaxy clusters in wide-field radio-continuum surveys to be conducted in the future. Using the Gemini Observatory and NASA’s Chandra spacecraft, a team of astronomers has provided new information about the radio galaxy 3C 17 and its environment. The observations show that 3C 17 is the brightest member of a newly found galaxy cluster. The finding is reported in a paper published October 18 on arXiv.org. Broadband 0.5 − 2 keV (left panel) and 0.5 − 7 keV (right panel) ACIS-S flux images centered on 3C 17. Image credit: Madrid et al., 2018. Explore further Researchers investigate the peculiar radio source IC 1531 Citation: 3C 17 is a member of a newly identified galaxy cluster, observations reveal (2018, October 29) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-10-3c-member-newly-galaxy-cluster.html More information: Juan P. Madrid et al. 3C 17: The BCG of a galaxy cluster at z=0.22. arXiv:1810.08274 [astro-ph.GA]. arxiv.org/abs/1810.08274 © 2018 Science X Network This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more