Shortage of skilled engineering workers in the North West – Claim

first_img Pinterest WhatsApp By News Highland – September 5, 2017 Shortage of skilled engineering workers in the North West – Claim Google+ Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Facebook WhatsApp Harps come back to win in Waterford Twitter Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Facebookcenter_img RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Google+ Twitter Previous articleCoastal erosion works to begin at CurransportNext articleHSE says changes at St Joseph’s Hospital will protect patient services and dignity News Highland Pinterest Journey home will be easier – Paul Hegarty DL Debate – 24/05/21 News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Homepage BannerNews Concern’s being raised about a lack of skilled engineering workers in the North West.One company in Leitrim says it has 15 Engineering jobs which it can’t fill because it can’t find enough people qualified to do the work.John McCartin is a Leitrim councillor, and Managing Director of Newtowngore Engineering says his company can’t take up millions of euro worth of work.The Fine Gael councillor says there’s a serious lack of people skilled in working with their hands……..Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/jobs9am.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.last_img read more

Steelers WR Wallace focused on efforts, not boos

first_imgWalking back to the huddle, beating himself up a little bit after failing to hold onto a Ben Roethlisberger heave that would have gotten the Steelers out of an early hole last week against San Diego, Wallace tried not to take it personally.That doesn’t mean he succeeded.“I think they’re out to get me a little bit,” Wallace said with a smile.Then again, the easygoing 26-year-old understands he has no one to blame but himself. Wallace took a calculated risk last summer when he decided to hold out during training camp. Coming off his first Pro Bowl and entering the prime of his career, Wallace didn’t want to leave the Steelers as much as he simply wanted to get paid a little more — OK, a lot more — to stay.When management balked, Wallace reported less than two weeks before the season started and pledged not to let his uncertain future mess with his head.It hasn’t exactly happened.Sure, Wallace is on pace to match the 72 receptions he put up a year ago and he needs two touchdowns over Pittsburgh’s final three games to set a new career-high.Yet it’s the slip-ups — such as a handful of costly drops and a pair of fumbles — that have outweighed the spectacular. Wallace is in the midst of perhaps the most productive season of his four-year career. It just doesn’t feel like it.While the former third-round pick has shown the ability to adapt to offensive coordinator Todd Haley’s short-passing game and he’s accepted the fact there are fewer deep shots to go around, he knows he’s done little to calm critics who viewed his holdout as a betrayal.“Anything I do is going to be magnified, good, bad, it doesn’t really matter,” he said. “I’ve just got to do what I need to do and I don’t give anybody a reason to say anything. Whatever happens I take full responsibility for it.”And to be honest, he’s OK with it.“I don’t want nobody to ever say it’s enough,” he said. “I always want somebody to have a knock on me. Always, because it’s always going to make me a better player and it’s always going to give me something to strive for.”Even if, at the moment, Wallace is content with striving to avoid the kind of mental miscues that have cost the Steelers (7-6) this season. They are, after all, tied with Cincinnati for the AFC’s last wild card spot heading into Sunday’s game in Dallas (7-6) and could be in a better place.Wallace has six drops this season, tied for 16th most in the NFL. The names higher on that list include Wes Welker, Calvin Johnson and Dez Bryant.The difference, of course, is that none of those guys skipped training camp, and Wallace knows it.“I made the bed,” he said. “I’ll lie in it.”No matter how uncomfortable it can get.Wallace raised eyebrows last week when he admitted to having his mind wander during games. Looking back, he admits he probably should have kept that to himself.“When you’re not getting the ball into the games sometime you might get a little frustrated and lose focus in the game, not on the game, but sometimes you get mentally not focused on the things you always need to be focused on,” he said.It certainly looked that way against the Chargers. Backed up deep in their own end in the second quarter, Roethlisberger tested his sprained right shoulder and flung it as far as he could. Wallace had a step on the defender and stretched to haul it in, only to have it bounce off his hands to the turf.Though Wallace rebounded to catch seven passes for 112 yards and two scores, it’s the one he couldn’t bring in that stuck with him afterward.“All I keep thinking about was the drop I had,” Wallace said. “But you can’t dwell on that.”Besides, there’s plenty of other things to think about, including the future. Wallace has tried to block out what will happen once the season ends, adding it would be “selfish” if he started wondering where he’ll be playing next year.Maybe, but with 2013 fast approaching, there’s a real chance Wallace could be playing his final games in Pittsburgh.The Steelers signed teammate Antonio Brown to a contract extension while Wallace was working out by himself in Florida. And the rapid development of Emmanuel Sanders combined with the money Wallace could earn on the open market makes the prospect of Wallace sticking around seem unlikely.If time is growing short, Wallace is trying to make it count. So is his quarterback.“He has all the confidence in himself and we have it in him,” Roethlisberger said. “We’re confident that he’s going to come out and be great. There’s never a second thought in my mind about it.”In Wallace’s either.“It’s not like I’m out here dropping every pass,” he said. “I made a lot of plays, too, as well. But I definitely would like to make every single play on the field.“I’ve just got to keep working at it and I think things will go my way.”NOTES: LB James Harrison (illness) did not practice on Wednesday … S Troy Polamalu was held out of practice but it was not injury related … LB LaMarr Woodley, who has missed the last two games with an ankle injury, was a full participant … Coach Mike Tomlin met with RB Rashard Mendenhall to talk about the one-game suspension Mendenhall received for conduct detrimental to the team. Tomlin called the meeting productive.(Follow Will Graves at www.twitter.com/WillGravesAP) by Will GravesAP Sports Writer PITTSBURGH (AP) — Mike Wallace heard the boos. And the Pittsburgh Steelers wide receiver knew it didn’t have as much to do with the pass that had just clanged off his hands as with the expectations — self-imposed or otherwise — he just can’t seem to meet. BIG CATCH–Pittsburgh Steelers wide receiver Mike Wallace (17) makes a touchdown catch past San Diego Chargers cornerback Quentin Jammer (23) in the third quarter on Dec. 9, in Pittsburgh. (AP Photo/Don Wright) last_img read more

Port Commission Invites Applicants for Citizens Advisory Committee

first_imgFacebook0Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Port of OlympiaThe Port of Olympia Commission is seeking applicants for the Port of Olympia Citizens Advisory Committee. The Citizens Advisory Committee comprises 9-13 citizen volunteers who meet monthly, or as needed, to address assignments from the Commission. Individual members also may be asked to participate with Port staff on a range of Port programs and projects. The committee has contributed citizen advice and assistance to the Port since the Commission formed it in 1994.Applicants must be Thurston County residents. Port Commission President, the Interim Executive Director and the Chair of the committee will interview applicants and recommend appointments to the Commission in Mid-December. Criteria for selection are community and economic development activities; volunteer, board or committee experience; work experience; experience or knowledge of the Port; and reasons for serving.To apply, please visit https://www.governmentjobs.com/careers/portofolympia. For information about past and current Citizen Advisory Committee projects, please visit the Port’s website at http://www.portolympia.com/90 or call 360-528-8014. The application deadline is Monday, November 5, 2018.For more information about the position and how to apply visit http://www.portolympia.com/last_img read more

Habitat for Humanity Homes Rising

first_imgThe proposed Atlantic Highlands Habitat property sits next to the Fireman’s Memorial Field in the borough. It would be the second Habitat home in Atlantic Highlands. The first is located at 8284 Memorial Parkway, a duplex constructed about two years ago. A recently completed house in Rumson was “wildly successful,” he said. “The concept of a Habitat for Humanity project is really a boon to the area and we’ve seen it over and over again,” Scharfenberger said. Scharfenberger, a former Middletown mayor with experience in state planning policy, said he supports Habitat projects for several reasons. He likes that houses are built with private funding and do not financially impact taxpayers. He also said Habitat homes typically rise on already developed lots that have either been abandoned, have fallen into disrepair or have been demolished. “I’d like to see those types of properties be redeveloped,” Scharfenberger said. A Habitat home is envisioned for 21 Leonard Ave. next to Fireman’s Memorial Field in Atlantic Highlands. Photo by Allison Perrine It is preferable to building affordable housing units on undeveloped land, which he says has “a devastating effect” on open space. Adam Hubeny, borough administrator, said Habitat for Humanity has been a “great partner” with the borough and it has been accommodating in property negotiations and designs. “They have always worked very well with Atlantic Highlands and we’re happy to work with them as a partner,” he said. By Allison Perrine Previously, the organization built an average of one or two Habitat homes per year. On average, it takes a year to 18 months to build these homes. If each municipality in Monmouth County had 10Habitat projects there wouldbe over 500 in the county,Scharfenberger said. Scharfenberger said he has met with officials in about a dozen towns to explain the value in having Habitat homes and they have been very receptive to the idea. He said he would like to see a certain number of Habitat projects in each town, though some municipalities are more suited for it than others. Families in need of affordable housing apply for homeownership through local Habitat for Humanity chapters and are chosen depending on their level of need, willingness to participate in the project and ability to repay an affordable mortgage. They partner with the organization and work alongside the volunteers to realize a home of their own. Officials from Habitat for Humanity in Monmouth County said the nonprofit has two projects nearing completion in Long Branch and Keansburg. Two additional properties are being planned in Long Branch as well. ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS – Habitat for Humanity projects are becoming more common in Monmouth County; nearly 83 percent of towns in the county now have at least one Habitat home. Gerry P. Scharfenberger, a member of the Monmouth County Board of Freeholders, is an advocate for Habitat homes because they are constructed by community volunteers with the full participation of the future homeowner. They can help satisfy affordable housing quotas imposed on municipalities. All of the Two Rivercommunities have Habitathomes. The next may be inAtlantic Highlands, wherethe borough council hasintroduced a plan to donateproperty at 21 Leonard Ave.A public hearing will be heldSept. 11. “You want to see affordable housing created the right way, not a court mandate,” Scharfenberger said.last_img read more

Local guidebook celebrates 15 years of mapping the Kootenays with new version

first_imgWhat started out as a living room enterprise by two brothers from Trail has grown into a cross-country venture that embraces Canada’s great outdoor spaces.The widely popular Backroad Mapbook series tackles BC`s Kootenay Rockies region with a comprehensive new 144-page guide. “Fishermen, families who enjoy camping, hikers and hunters, people who like canoeing or cruising backroads — we appeal to all of them,” said company co-founder Russell Mussio. This broad appeal is the reason the Kootenay Rockies BC Backroad Mapbook has been the local guidebook of choice for over 15 years and a national best seller. It combines reference information with highly detailed maps which feature up-to-date forest service and logging roads, extensive trail systems and a wide range of recreational features that are not found on other maps. The series was born out of the Mussio brothers` frustration with what was available for exploring BC`s backcountry. “We’d literally have a different map or guidebook for hiking, for canoeing and for fishing, along with a few outdated topo maps with us; it was almost comical,” said Russell.  “It felt like we had to carry around a box full of stuff in the bush with us.” Nearly 20 years later, the rudimentary maps have evolved, the printing press has been replaced and the small apartment has been upgraded to a working office and warehouse where Russell no longer needs to sleep. The in-depth reference and map information requires a team of local researchers and writers to ensure regional information is accurate and noteworthy. Also, relationships with fishing and outdoor clubs, park superintendents, hiking enthusiasts, Government Ministries, and of course, feedback directly from readers, contribute to maintaining the most up-to-date maps available. Partners like ATV BC, BC Parks, Golden Hikes, Camping & RV in BC, Freshwater Fisheries Society of BC, Trails BC and Recreation Sites and Trails BC were instrumental in providing insider details for readers. The universal appeal for taking off into the backcountry has seen the Backroad Mapbooks series expand to include GPS maps, digital editions and 28 books for BC, Alberta, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Ontario as well as the Maritimes, with over 1.5 million books in circulation.last_img