Quebec to set up provincial body to control marijuana industry

Quebec tabled cannabis legislation on Thursday that will give a provincially run agency tight control over the purchase, storage and sale of the drug.A newly created subsidiary of Quebec’s liquor corporation will oversee the pot industry, Public Health Minister Lucie Charlebois said in the national assembly as she tabled Bill 157.Charlebois said the bill forbids minors from possessing cannabis, prohibits people from growing it for personal use and stipulates that smoking it will be banned in the same places where smoking tobacco is illegal.Will marijuana advertising follow the restrictions placed on alcohol or on tobacco?Weed is the new craft beer, says former Budweiser exec: ‘Ignore it at your peril’The bill introduces “a new principle of zero tolerance” regarding drivers caught under the influence of marijuana or any other drug.“It prohibits anyone from driving a vehicle … or having control of a vehicle if there is any detectable presence of cannabis or any other drug in their saliva,” Charlebois said.The bill also gives police officers the power to demand saliva samples from drivers suspected of being under the influence.Only the new agency — the Societe quebecoise du cannabis — will be allowed to buy cannabis from a producer, transport it, store it and sell it, although there may be certain exceptions.Ottawa has promised marijuana will be legal across Canada by next July 1 and has left it to the provinces to create their own legal framework on how the law would be enforced on their territory.Quebec tabled the legislation a day after it again asked the federal government to push back the July 1 deadline by one year so the province can reach agreement with Ottawa on various money-related issues such as the division of tax revenues.On Thursday, the national assembly adopted a motion by a margin of 97-2 to ask Ottawa to delay implementing the law. read more

Under Armour CEO responds to criticism of Trump praise

by The Associated Press Posted Feb 15, 2017 7:03 am MDT Last Updated Feb 15, 2017 at 9:40 am MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email BALTIMORE – The CEO of Baltimore-based sports apparel company Under Armour responded Wednesday to criticism he received after calling President Donald Trump “an asset to the country.”In an open letter to Baltimore published as a full-page advertisement in The Baltimore Sun, Kevin Plank wrote that he wanted to clarify what values he and his company stand for.“In a business television interview last week, I answered a question with a choice of words that did not accurately reflect my intent,” he wrote referring to an interview on CNBC on Feb. 7.The company stands for equal rights and job creation and believes “immigration is a source of strength, diversity and innovation for global companies based in America,” Plank wrote. Also, the company opposes the president’s travel ban.“With an anticipated new executive order on immigration set to come out, we will join a coalition of companies in opposition to any new actions that negatively impact our team, their families or our community,” he said.Three celebrities the company sponsors — NBA star Stephen Curry, actor Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson and ballerina Misty Copeland — were among those voicing concerns about his praise of Trump.Johnson sent out a statement on social media last Thursday saying Plank’s words “were divisive and lacking in perspective.” Copeland wrote in an Instagram post she was so concerned about Plank’s comments that she spoke to him directly. In this Saturday, Jan. 17, 2015 photo, Under Armour founder Kevin Plank sits courtside during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game between Maryland and Michigan State, in College Park, Md. Plank, is responding to criticism he received after calling President Donald Trump “an asset to the country.” Plank wrote an open letter to Baltimore published as a full-page advertisement in The Baltimore Sun Wednesday, Feb. 15, 2017. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky) Under Armour CEO responds to criticism of Trump praise read more

At key technology conference SecretaryGeneral warns of digital divide in Internet age

In a video message to the ITU World Conference on International Telecommunications, taking place in Dubai, in the United Arab Emirates, Secretary-General Ban called on Member States to maintain the free electronic flow of ideas and information, adding that the UN “stands behind the goal of an open Internet.”“A digital divide has no place in the information age and 21st-century knowledge economy,” he said. “Our overall objective must be to ensure universal access to information and communication technology – including for the two-thirds of the world’s population currently not online.” The 11-day conference – which is slated to run until 14 December – will bring an estimated 1,900 delegates from 193 nations together to review the current International Telecommunications Regulations (ITRs), which function as the binding global treaty designed to facilitate international interconnection of information and communication services, as well as ensuring their efficiency and widespread public usefulness and availability. Although the treaty sets out general principles for assuring the free flow of information around the world, media reports have anticipated diplomatic clashes between Member States over the level of global oversight necessary in regulating the internet, with some delegates reportedly voicing concern that too much regulation would potentially stifle online freedom of expression and ease of communication. In his address, the Secretary-General affirmed the need for a free internet as part of the digital citizen’s “right to communicate” and share ideas across all media and all frontiers. “Information and communications technologies are transforming our world, opening doors, educating and empowering people, saving lives,” Mr. Ban said, pointing to the effects of social media and technology in driving the Arab Spring protests and similar democratization efforts around the world. “We must continue to work together and find consensus on how to effectively keep cyberspace open, accessible, affordable and secure for all,” he added. read more